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Urania Urania 2 x Xeon E5620 2 x NVIDIA S2050 3584 GPU cores - 24 Gb RAM
... men who have been instructed of her she raises aloft to heaven (ouranos), for it is a fact that imagination and the power of thought lift men's souls to heavenly heights ...
Clio Clio 2 x Xeon E5620 4 x NVIDIA GTX 580 1920 GPU cores - 12 Gb RAM
... the praise which poets sing in their encomia bestows great glory (kleos) upon those who are praised ...
Euterpe Euterpe 2 x Xeon E5620 1 x NVIDIA S2050 1792 GPU cores - 24 Gb RAM
... she gives to those who hear her sing delight (terpein) in the blessings which education bestows ...
Thalia Thalia
... men whose praises have been sung in poems flourish (thallein) through long periods of time ...
Melpomene Melpomene
... from the chanting (melodia) by which she charms the souls of her listeners ...
Terpsichore Terpsichore
... she delights (terpein) her disciples with the good things which come from education ...
Erato Erato
... she makes those who are instructed by her men who are desired and worthy to be loved ...
Polyhymnia Polyhymnia
... by her great (polle) praises (humnesis) she brings distinction to writers whose works have won for them immortal fame ...
Calliope Calliope
... because of her beautiful (kale) voice (ops), that is, by reason of the exceeding beauty of her language she winds the approbation of her auditors ...

THE MUSES
[4.7.1] As for the Muses, since we have referred to them in connection with the deeds of Dionysus, it may be appropriate to give the facts about them in summary. For the majority of writers of myths and those who enjoy the greatest reputation say that they were daughters of Zeus and Mnemosynê; but a few poets, among whose number is Alcman, sate that they were daughters of Uranus and Gê.
[4.7.2] Writers similarly disagree also concerning the number of the Muses; for some say that they are three, and others that they are nine, but the number nine has prevailed since it rests upon the authority of the most distinguished men, such as Homer and Hesiod and others like them. Homer, for instance, writes:
The Muses, nine in all, replying each to each with voices sweet;and Hesiod even gives their names when he writes:
Cleio, Euterpê, and Thaleia, Melpomenê, Terpsichorê and Erato, and Polymnia, Urania, Calliopê too, of them all the most comely.
[4.7.3] To each of the Muses men assign her special aptitude for one of the branches of the liberal arts, such as poetry, song, pantomimic dancing, the round dance with music, the study of the stars, and the other liberal arts. They are also believed to be virgins, as most writers of myths say, because men consider that the high attainment which is reached through education is pure and uncontaminated.
[4.7.4] Men have given the Muses their name from the word muein, which signifies the teaching of those things which are noble and expedient and are not known by the uneducated. For the name of each Muse, they say, men have fond a reason appropriate to her: Cleio is so named because the praise which poets sing in their encomia bestows great glory (kleos) upon those who are praised; Euterpê, because she gives to those who hear her sing delight (terpein) in the blessings which education bestows; Thaleia, because men whose praises have been sung in poems flourish (thallein) through long periods of time; Melpomenê, from the chanting (melodia) by which she charms the souls of her listeners; Terpsichorê, because she delights (terpein) her disciples with the good things which come from education; Erato, because she makes those who are instructed by her men who are desired and worthy to be loved; Polymnia, because by her great (polle) praises (humnesis) she brings distinction to writers whose works have won for them immortal fame; Urania, because men who have been instructed of her she raises aloft to heaven (ouranos), for it is a fact that imagination and the power of thought lift men's souls to heavenly heights; Calliopê, because of her beautiful (kale) voice (ops), that is, by reason of the exceeding beauty of her language she winds the approbation of her auditors.

Diodorus Siculus, Library of History (trans. C.H. Oldfather)